Inventory of Vines “The Shambles”

VINES at “The Shambles” 2016

Key for historic reference notations to Plant entries:

“Catalogue of the Plants in the Queensland Botanic Gardens”. Walter Hill, Government Printer, Brisbane 1875.                            1. 1875

“Catalogue of Plants in the two Metropolitan Gardens, The Brisbane Botanic Garden and Bowen Park (The Garden of the Queensland Acclimatization Society). Frederick Manson Bailey, Colonial Botonist, Government Printer, Brisbane 1885                                     1A. 1885

“Designed Landscapes in Queensland, 1859-1939”, Jean Sim, QUT, 1999, APPENDIX G, referred to the following plant lists:

“The Flower garden in Queensland, containing concise and practical instructions for the Cultivation of the flower garden. And the management of Pot Plants in Australia”, Albert Hockings, Slater & Co, Brisbane, 1875                                                                     2. 1875

“Cultural Industries in Queensland: Papers on the Cultivation of Useful Plants suited to the climate of Queensland:their value as food, in the arts, and in medicine; and methods of Obtaining their products” Lewis Bernays, Government printer, Brisbane , 1883, (pp 201-207, The Shade of trees)                                                                     3. 1883

“Tree Planting for Shade and Ornament: Suggestions for teachers and others interested in the Planting of Trees” Edward Shelton, Dept of Agriculture, Government Printer, Brisbane, Bulletin 17, 1892

List: Philip McMahon, Brisbane Botanic gardens Curator     4a.  1892

        Ebenezer Cowley, Overseer, State Nursery, Kamerunga4b.  1892

        J S Edgar , Botanic gardens , Rockhampton                 4c.   1892

      William Soutter, Manager , Acclimatization society      4d.   1892

“General Catalogue of Seeds, Plants, bulbs, Tubers, trees, Climbers, etc.” Samuel Eaves, Howard, printer, Brisbane, 1897           5.    1897

 

“Queenslander” under ‘Horticulture’ section ‘Shrubs’, William Soutter, 18/12/1897 pp 1181                                                            6.    1897

“General descriptive Catalogue for 1874, of Fruit trees, Shrubs, Ornamental and forest trees, Etc. etc” Charles Wyatt, Frogmore Nursery, Geelong 1874                                                          7.    1874

“1896 Catalogue of Flower roots”. Law, Somner & Co., Melbourne, 1896                                                                                      8.   1896

“Catalogue of Plants for Sale by Michael Guilfoyle” Exotic Nursery, Double bay, Sydney 1851                                                       9.   1851

“Catalogue of Plants for Sale at the Victoria Nursery, Richmond” George Brunning, Melbourne, 1855                                                  10.  1855

“Report on the Progress and Condition of the Botanic Garden and Government Plantations, 1873”, R.Schomburgk, W.C.Cox: Government Printer, Adelaide, 1874                                                          11.  1874

“Botanic Gardens, Brisbane, Catalogue of Plants 1962”, Brisbane city Council, Brisbane, 1962                                                        12. 1962

“Federation Gardens: Plant lists, Compiled from Searl & Sons General Catalogue 1901, Seeds, Plants & Bulbs for Sydney; Pearce Bros.Descriptive Catalogue and Guide 1900; Robert Little & Co’s Catalogue of Flower seeds Sydney 1900: Rumsey’s 1882 Catalogue (Roses) Sydney 1882 www.heritage.nsw.gov.au                    13. 1900/1

“Talgai Homestead, Plant Ledger, commenced in 1868-1907 by Ellen and George Clark. Additions after 1907-1942 George Carr Clark, 1945-1965 Bardwell”                                                                     14. 1868                                              

www.hortuscamden.com ,Hortus camdenensis: an illustrated catalogue of plants collected by Sir William Macarthur at Camden Park, NSW, Australia between about c.1820 & 1861 / by Colin Mills     15. Camden

“The Garden Plants of China” Peter Valder, Florilegium, Sydney 1999      16. China

Allamanda cathartica hybrid “Winter Velvet”. A trailing or climbing plant with crimson through to red flowers in winter, becoming paler in summer. Garden hybrid, originally from tropical Americas.1.1875 (8 species Allamanda), 6.1897, 9.1851, 13.1900/1 Fernery

Asarina barclaiana syn. Maurandya barclaiana A slender twining and self seeding plant. Mauve flowers freely bourne in summer. Can ‘volunteer’ throughout the garden, requiring some control. Introduced to Britain from Mexico in 1825 when seeds of it were received by Robert Barclay, Esq. Maurandia Barclayana was ticked in a Camden copy of the Horticultural Register, August 1831.  Mexico.1.1875 (Maurandya barclayana), 1A.1885 (M.barclayana) 7.1897, 10.1855, 15.Camden Wisteria trellis

Chonemorpha fragrans (climbing frangipani) Deciduous thick stemmed climber, or trailing plant. Single cream-white flowers resembling ‘frangipani’ in summer.India-Malaya Eastern Border archway

Clerodendron speciosissimum syn. C.fallax (mauve bleeding heart vine) Reminiscent of C.thompsonii but less invasive. Tall growing shrub or climbing plant. Introduced to Britain in 1835.  It was obtained for Camden Park NSW from Kew Gardens as Clerodendrum fallax, brought out from England by Captain P. P. King in 1849 and it had also been requested of Loddiges’, 1848.  South Africa.15.Camden Pool Yard

Clitorea ternata (butterfly pea) Evergreen climber with royal blue flower in summer Tropical Asia.1.1875, 1A.1885, 9.1851 Replaced annually if possible. Will self seed and return spontaneously.

Dipladenia sanderi syn. Mandevilla sanderi Red and white flowering cultivar of lax shrub, twining creeper .Fernery, Central Shrub Gardens

Ficus stipulacca syn F.pumila (creeping fig) A tough plant but also a potential nuisance. 1A.1885, 10,1855 Archway Back Stairs

Hedera hibernica ? helix (Irish ?English Ivy). Evergreen clinging climber or ground cover grown for foliage form.  May be invasive if allowed to spread outside area of use.  An ancient garden plant.  Western Europe.1A.1885 (3 varieties), 7.1897 (H.helix), 10.1855 (H.helix),15.Camden Over concrete tank near driveway

Hoya carnosa var. compacta (Indian Rope). Hoya with reflexing and folding glaucous leaves. Asia 10.1855 Fernery

Hoya carnosa A twining climber with glaucous leaves and pendulous flower clusters of interesting dusky colours including pink. Resents overwatering or disturbance of growing shoots. Introduced to in Britain in 1802 Australia, India, China, Pacific. 1A.1885 (5 species), 7.1897, 13.1900/1 Hydrangea walk, Blue trellis garden

Hoya kerrii (Sweet heart plant) large heart shaped leaves, white flowers. A specimen was collected by Arthur Francis George Kerr 1910 in or 1911 in the mountains west of Chiang Mai (Northern Thailand) at an altitude of 390 m above sea level. It was transplanted to Kew Gardens where it flourished in August 1911 South East Asia Orchid walk

Hoya pauciflora This genus was named by botanist Robert Brown, in honour of his friend, botanist Thomas Hoy.  Hoya pauciflora it was described in 1841. This one can be grown either hanging or wrapped around a support. I’ve tried both and hanging is definitely the easiest way to grow this hoya. The leaves are very narrow, the length varies from 3-9 cm but the width is no more than 1 cm. The leaves are often a little curved, have lowered center veins and some flecks. The colour is mostly dark green, but if grown in bright sunlight the leaves get paler green. It’s said that this hoya needs cooler temperatures to develop the beautiful white flowers with small red coronas. These flowers are 2.5 cm each and they grow mostly one by one. They have a fresh fragrance, produce small drops of nectar and last almost two weeks. India (Malabar, Kerala), Sri Lanka

Hoya kentiana best suitable for growing as a hanging plant. It has a thin light green stalk. The stringbean like leaves are very narrow, dark green and almost “bent” along the leaf. The size of the leaves are 3″ to 5″ long and 0.5″ wide. The flowers are downy balls with reddish lilac backwards bend petals and darker corona. The flower stalk can become up to 1″ to 2″ long and the single flower stalk about 1″.– Philippines

Ipomea horsfalliae syn. I. ternata (cardinal creeper) Deciduous vine with brilliant carmine red flower clusters. A twiner which may need support. Seeds were reportedly received by Charles Horsfall, either from Africa? or from the East Indies?, and raised by his very skillful gardener, Mr. Henry Evans, at Everton, where the plants produced their lovely blossoms in great profusion during the months of December and January 1833-4.  This is a winter bloomer. The ruby red to magenta-violet flowers, 4 – 7 cm in diameter. Tropical vine is named for Charles Horsfall (1776-1846), an avid botanist who was Lord Mayor of Liverpool, and whose wife, Dorothy, was a noted botanical artist. This spectacular plant is a native of South America (Brazil, Guyana, Surinam and Venezuela), and has also become naturalized in the humid forests of the Caribbean, especially in Jamaica. It is also very common, and now naturalized, in Hawaii, where it was introduced by Prince Kuhio (1871-1922). In its native range the plant is almost solely fertilized by hummingbirds, and where these are lacking or scarce, fruiting seldom occurs. Most parts of the plant are poisonous if ingested. Arch East Border garden. SE Corner Car garage. Brazil, Guyana, Surinam and Venezuela.1.1875, 1A.1885, 7.1897 Driveway, car garage

Jasminium in 1885 Brisbane catalogue incl 7 species. J.grandiflorum, hirsutum, nudiflorum, officinale, revolutum, sambac and simplicifolia.

Jasminium nitidum (windmill Jasmine) A low shrub or twining climber with shiny foliage and star shapred flowers in spring summer.7.1897 Fenced Rose garden, Gatehouse

Jasminium polyanthum (Chinese jasmine) Vigorous twining and climbing plant with intensely fragrant white flowers in clusters in spring. An evergreen which may be used to cover a structure or fence China.7.1897 (J.grandiflorum?, J.gracilis), 9.1851 Eastern Borders.

Jasminum sambac, J. sambac hybrid “Grand Duke of Tuscany” Beautiful fragrance from single flowers on woody climber or low shrub. The hybrid ‘Grand Duke’ has double flowers that do not open completely. It may have been in the royal garden at Hampton-Court at the end of the seventeenth century; but it was little known in Europe till it was imported from the East-Indies to the garden belonging to the academy at Pisa, about the year 1691. South and south west Asia.1A.1885, 7.1897 (J.zambac), 9.1851, 15.Camden Back Verandah, Eastern borders, South Rose garden

Lathyrus odoratus (sweet pea) well known annual climber with perfumed pea flowers of many garden varietal colours Southern Europe, garden Varieties 1A.1885 Containers annually

Lonicera japonica (honeysuckle) A strong climber and a traditional garden favourite. Lovely fragrance from cream-white flowers in spring-summer. May be invasive if escapes its location. China.1.1875 (9 species lonicera), 1A.1885 (5 species incl L.caprifolium, L.japonica), 7.1897, 10.1855, 14.1868 (conjuva, mauritana) Driveway Car garage

Lonicera x heckrottii (red honeysuckle) A garden hybrid honeysuckle with larger flowers containg crimson-red. Back Verandah

Pandorea jasminoides syn. Bignonia jasminoides syn. Tecoma jasminoides A climbing plant with strong evergreen foliage and pink flowers. Other flower colour hybrids are available. According to Johnson’s Dictionary introduced to Britain in 1830. ‘A climbing shrub of humble growth, a native of Moreton Bay.’  Australia 1.1875 (?Bignonia jasminoides, 7 Bignonia spp), 1A.1885 (4 bignonia species and Tecoma jasminoides), 14.1868 (T.jasminoides),15.Camden

Pandorea jasminoides variegatum Cultivar of Australian rainforest climber with pink flowers and variegated foliage. Vigorous and reliable. Garden hybrid Archway at Back stairs

Pandorea pandorana syn. Bignonia pandorana (Wonga Vine). Australian rainforest climber with cream-white tubular flowers in spring/summer. Andrews’ Botanical Repository figures Bignonia pandorana, collected on Norfolk Island and introduced by the nurserymen Lee and Kennedy in 1793.  Australia 15.Camden

Pandorea pandorana “Golden Showers”, (Wonga Vine). Yellow flowering hybrid of this Australian climber with golden flowers in spring/summer Garden hybrid Australia Archway at Back Stairs

Parthenocissus quinquefolia syn.Cissus hederacea Syn.Vitis hederacea Syn.Ampelopsis hederacea Syn. Ampelopsis quinquefolia  Syn. Hedera quinquefolia (Virginia creeper) Beautiful deciduous cover clinging vine, typically used on walls and structures for lush green summer foliage turning red in autumn. Introduced to Britain in 1629. In the 1857 Camden Park NSW list. North America 15.Camden West side of House over bathroom walls

Petrea volubis  Purple Wreath A woody climber with sandpapery leaves, and dramatic blue single flowers in spring. Front Embankment/House sign Central America.1.1875, 1A.1885, 9.1851 Gatehouse

Podraea rosea syn.Bignonia rosea (Rosea vine) deciduous woody climber. Pink trumpet shaped flowers bourne in summer. Will spread by suckers. Does not do well in our garden. Africa.1.1875 (7 Bignonia species) Criss Cross garden, Driveway Car Garage

Phaseolus caracalla syn. Vigna caracalla (snail creeper) A vigorous tendril climber with attractive mauve helical flowers giving the plant it’s name. Americas 1.1875, 1A.1885 Eastern Borders Archway

Phaseolus giganteus (Pink-White snail creeper) semi-deciduous tendril creeper, helical flowers South America Eastern Borders, on arch with Climbing Frangipani Lost 2015

Philodendron oxycardium A clinging plant with fleshy stems and large heart shaped leaves. Grown indoors in southern climates it forms an attractive tree climber in warm climate gardens. Tropical Americas, West Indies.Araucaria walk

Pseudocalymma alliaceum (Brazilian beauty) Attractive evergreen climber, beautiful mauve trumpet flowers in summer. Foliage has strong garlic scent. May invade via suckering. South America.1A.1885 (Adenocalymma nitidum?) Central Shrub garden

Pyrostegia venusta syn. Pyrostegia ignea   Orange Trumpet vine. Flame vine is a rampant climber that carries cascades of bright orange tubular flowers. he plant from which the painting of P. venusta in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine was illustrated was collected in Brazil in 1815 by Admiral Sir John Beresford (Second Sea Lord and Conservative politician). The species was first described by John Miers in 1863 Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay.  Northwest Cornet garden West Fence

Quisqualis indica (Rangoon creeper) deciduous woody twiner with red and white flower panicles in summer and a magnificent sweet perfume. This may invade by suckering if unchecked. It was exhibited at the Horticultural Society under the name of Q. sinensis in july 1841. Listed in the 1850 and 1857 catalogues of Camden Park NSW. Tropical Asia 1A.1885, 9.1851.Eastern border Garden

Senecio macroglossus variegatus (variegated ivy) Twiner with variegated Ivy like foliage and yellow daisy flowers. A member of asteracea and not an ivy Tropical Americas 1A.1885 (7 species), 10.1855 (2 species) Driveway, pillar of garage.

Solanum jasminoides (Potato Creeper) A strong evergreen climber with small white star shaped flowers in summer. Introduced to Europe in 1838 via North America.  South America Brazil 1.1875 (35 species of Solanum shrubs and climbers), 1A.1885 (12 species), 9.1851, 15.Camden Fenced Rose garden

Solanum seaforthianum (blue potato creeper, Brazilian Nightshade) An evergreen climber similar to S.jasminoides beautiful blue flowers, followed by poisonous red berries. Self seeds and is invasive. Brazil Fenced Rose garden, Gatehouse.

Solanum wendlandii (Giant potato creeper), Blue potato creeper) Deciduous thorny woody twiner with beautiful blue flowers in early summer. South America.Driveway, pillar of Car garage

Stephanotis floribunda (Bridal Creeper) Strong semi-deciduous twiner with beautiful fragrant white bells and very large inedible pods.  According to Mabberly introduced to Australia by John Bidwill from Madagascar.  One plant was presented to the Sydney Botanic Garden by William Macarthur in1847 Madagascar. 1A.1885, 7.1897, 9.1851 Fenced Rose garden

Tecomanthe dendrophylla Commercial label indicates T.hillii (Fraser Island creeper) Climber with support. Spectacular pendulous crimson –pink flower clusters. Twining tips resent handling and will die back. Australia.1A.1885 (Tecoma hillii) Eastern Borders, Trellis with blue snail creeper

Thunbergia alata. (Black eyed Susan) A small leafed twiner with orange-yellow flowers with a black throat. First botanically described in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine in 1825,the name under which the seeds were received, given it by Mr. Bojer, a German botanist. Eastern Africa.1.1875 (7 species of Thunbergia), 1A.1885 Blue trellis garden

Thunbergia mysorensis (Slipper Vine), An hardy climber with pendulous orange slipper shaped flowers. India Western Hedge

Trachelospermum jasminoides syn. Rhynchospermum jasminoides (Chinese star jasmine) Tough climber with milky latex if cut. Very fragrant star shaped flowers in spring. An old fashioned favourite. It is a native of Shanghai, where it was collected by Mr. Fortune, and introduced by him to the stoves of England by 1846. China.1.1875, 1A.1885, 7.1897, 14.1868 North Lawn Trellis

Wisteria sinensis Very strong growing deciduous woody climber that may be invasive and requires its own structure or standardization. We have the mauve flowering Wisteria. Other wisteria species and garden hybrids are available. China 1A.1885 (Wistaria chinensis, also var.alba) Wisteria Trellis

Welcome to our country Garden at Montville in Queensland